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In India, the moonstone was considered lucky and sacred. Moonstone was highly valued as a gift to loved ones, as it was considered capable of awakening a tender passion and giving lovers the opportunity to learn the future destiny.

In Greek mythology, pearl spar was associated with legendary Hyperboreans. The northern country of the Hyperboreans gave the world moonstones, enclose in them mystical revelations and the ability to visions. Mages always valued these properties of moonstones, but treated them with great care, as the stones could destroy wizards.

In historical documents about the Chaldeans who lived in southern Mesopotamia in the first millennium BC, it was reported that they especially appreciated the magical properties of moonstones: on the full moon, when the strength of the stone increased, the Chaldean priests placed it under the tongue and uttered prayers and prophecies.



The adularia in Ceylon was considered sacred and bringing happiness.

In the Middle Ages in Europe interest in the moonstone did not fade away. It was called a stone of lovers, the girls wore it as an amulet and believed that it brings happiness in love. They also said that the stone was crying on a moonlit night and that the moisture it produced healed the fever. In general, the moonstone was endowed with other healing properties. Even now many people still believe that it helps with epilepsy, heals the kidneys. In addition, according to ancient legends, Moonstone is one of the best natural psychotherapists: it helps to cope with depression, relieves the feeling of fear, helps to survive the situations associated with severe emotions and emotional stress.

Some men are still convinced that moonstone helps women to curb hysterical attacks and cool the desires of nymphomaniacs.
There are many legends about the moonstone. They say, for example, that a white spot appears on its surface, growing as the moon shines before the full moon.

At this time, the magic forces return to the stone. Since the publication of Wilkie Collins's novel "Moonstone" in 1868, the image of a mysterious mineral that influences the fate of people and associated with the deities of the East invariably excites mystical lovers of precious stones.

However, Collins was referring to a yellow diamond, whereas a moonstone is a completely different gem: adularia, a selenite and pearl spar.

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